Distillery waste biogas

The spent solid and liquid non-alcohol outputs of distilleries have historically been treated as waste. However, the liquid and solid wastes of the distillation industry have greater potential and can be sent to anaerobic digesters and converted into biogas. This biogas in turn can be turned into renewable electricity at high efficiency via gas engines, or cleaned and upgraded to biomethane.

Alcohol for human consumption such as alcoholic spirits and for industrial purposes is typically created via the distillation of weaker, biologically produced alcohols. Biologically produces alcohols derive from fermented mash of starchy plant matter such as grain, wheat, rye, rice, maize, molasses and potatoes. The spent by-products of this process have historically been treated as waste. However, the liquid and solid wastes of the distillation industry have greater potential and can be sent to anaerobic digesters and converted into biogas. This biogas in turn can be turned into renewable electricity at high efficiency via Jenbacher gas engines.

In parallel to the electricity production the generators produce waste heat, which can either be recovered as hot water or used in boilers to provide steam. Due to the high energy requirements of the distillation process the heat and steam are particularly useful to reduce onsite energy demand, further reducing carbon emissions.

Benefits of Cogeneration

  • Reduce plant energy demands
  • Production of renewable power
  • Treatment of a problematic waste stream
  • Reduce carbon emissions
  • Support environmental certification for products

Creation of biogas

Biogas results from anaerobic fermentation of organic materials. As a metabolic product of the participating methanogens and acidogenic bacteria, the prerequisites for its production are a lack of oxygen, a pH value from 6.5 to 7.5 and a constant temperature of 35-45°C (mesophilic) or 45-55°C (thermophilic). The digestion period or retention period is typically between 10 and 30 days depending upon the type of digestion employed. The anaerobic digestion systems of today operate largely within the mesophilic temperature range.

Biogas results from anaerobic fermentation of organic materials. As a metabolic product of the participating methanogens and acidogenic bacteria, the prerequisites for its production are a lack of oxygen, a pH value from 6.5 to 7.5 and a constant temperature of 35-45°C (mesophilic) or 45-55°C (thermophilic). The digestion period or retention period is typically between 10 and 30 days depending upon the type of digestion employed. The anaerobic digestion systems of today operate largely within the mesophilic temperature range.

Biogas quality

The biogas may contain high levels of water (humidity) and sulphur, depending upon the feedstock of the digester. Developers of biogas plants should consider the potential for gas contamination when designing their facility. Please contact your local Clarke Energy sales office to provide you with technical instructions for fuel gas quality to understand the required specific limits. Clarke Energy can supply fuel gas treatment equipment either free issue, or as part of a turnkey scope of supply. These typically include carbon filters, gas dehumidifiers and gas boosters

Competence

Clarke Energy has extensive experience in the development of gas engine generation projects utilising biologically derived gases. Clarke Energy has also engineered and installed numerous biogas CHP power facilities linked specifically to distilleries in the UK and in India. If you would like to discuss how Clarke Energy can help you develop your project, please contact your local office.

Any Further Questions?

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